The Brief War of An Only Son: PFC Jochanan Tartakower, May 3, 1925 – September 29, 1944


PFC Jochanan Tartakower
32999991
315th Infantry Regiment, 79th Infantry Division
United States Army

“….for the past few years I have been preparing myself mentally for that event,
and now I feel that the hour is coming when I,
in my small way,
will avenge the crimes committed.

And I think in my place, being an infantryman,
I will get my best chance.

I think a lot about the movement and about Aretz;
it is curious how war can influence your thinking,
and being in the army and fighting even more.”

May 3, 1925 (Lodz Poland) – September 29, 1944 (France)
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

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On January 10, 1945, the New York Times published a Casualty List covering the New York Metropolitan area, Northern New Jersey, and Connecticut, which – though by no means the largest Casualty List that appeared in the Times during the war – was staggering in terms of its nominal visual impact, let alone the number of names appearing within it.

The List was extracted from a nationwide Casualty List comprised of 6,178 names, specifically being limited to members of the Army killed and wounded in the European Theater of War.  Like other Casualty Lists that appeared in wartime newspapers, the presentation of information was simple, stark, and straightforward:

Entries were limited to the soldier’s surname, his given (first and middle) names, the name of his next-of-kin (mother; father; wife; friend; aunt; uncle), specific residential address (for soldiers who resided in the five boroughs of New York), while for soldiers from New Jersey or Connecticut, the “address” was limited to his city or town of residence.

Each name on the list represented a person – a world – that extended well beyond the nominal confines of a name, rank, serial number, and military unit.  Each name on the list embodied a past, a brief present, and future that would not be.  Each name on the embodied and symbolized told a unique story.

One of the names on the list was – like many names on the list – for a simple Private First Class.  His name?  Jochanan Tartakower.  His story was markedly – if not dramatically – different from most.

He was born in Poland in 1925, the only child of Dr. Arieh and Malwina Tartakower. 

Dr. Tartakower, a graduate of the University of Vienna with specializations in demography and sociology, had a lifelong involvement in a variety of leadership and academic research positions in Jewish affairs, particularly in the realms of Labor Zionism, aid and assistance for Jewish refugees, and ultimately as Chairman of the Department of Sociology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.  His life was one of idealism, action, and academic research, the last exemplified through the publication of numerous articles and books, the titles of some of the latter being listed in his Jewish Virtual Library and Wikipedia entries.  Born in Poland in 1897, he died in Jerusalem in November of 1982.

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Dr. Arieh Tartakower, from his Wikipedia entry.

Strikingly, however, neither of the above references, nor his obituary at the Jewish Telegraphic Agency mention his son, Jochanan, the course of whose life – dictated by other forces – took a very different course.

Born in Lodz in 1925, Jochanan reached the United States in 1941, where his father had been residing after the 1939 World Zionist Congress in Geneva.  (The accounts of their journeys differ between The American Hebrew and Aufbau.  Both are presented below – with the latter probably being more accurate.)  Malwina had a far more arduous journey, reaching America only after traveling through the Soviet Union, the Yishuv, and possibly Japan, probably reaching her husband and son in 1943. 

Once in America, Jochanan, who listed his home address as 129 West 85th Street in Manhattan, enrolled in City College, where he studied engineering.

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The first notice of Jochanan’s death was penned by Max Beer and published in Aufbau on October 27, 1944.  The article and my (approximate!) translation are presented below:

Aufbau

Friday, October 27, 1944

Dr. A. Tartakower – Mitglied der Exekutive des Jüdischen Weltkongresses – und seine Gattin Malwina wurden in diesen Tagen durch das War Department davon verstangt, dass ihr einziger Sohn, der neunzehnjährige Pfc. Jochanan am 29. September in Frankreich “in action” den Tod gefunden hat.  Mit den Eltern trauern alle ihre Freunde um den hochbegabten liebenswerten jungen Mann, der mit Begeisterung in den Krieg zog, als Amerikaner und als Jude.

Jochanan Tartakower, geboren am 3. Mai 1925 in Lodz, war nach einer abenteurlichen Flucht Polen im Jahre 1941 in Amerika eingetroffen, wo sein Vater weilte, nachdem ihn die Invasion Polens im September 1939 auf dem Genfer Zionistkongress uberrascht hatte.  Der Mutter, die der Krieg ebenfalls von ihrem Sohn getrennt hatte, gelang es erst nach vier Jahren, in mühseliger Wanderung uber Russland und Palastina, die Ihren in Amerika wiederzufinden.

Aber die Familie sollte nocht lange vereitn bleiben.  Jochanan, der am City College Ingenieurwissenschaft mit glanzendem Erfolg studierte.  Prasident der Habonim und, wie die Eltern, tif mit hebráischem und judischen Wissen vertraut war, tockte kurze Zeit nach der Ankunft der Mutter in das Heer ein und ging nach Frankreich.

Alle, die den prächtigen, vornehmen jungen Mann gekannt haben, liebten ihn ung sagten im eine glänzende Freunde von Arieh und Malwina Tartakower, die das unermüdliche Wirken des Ehepaares für die Sache des Judentums und der Menschheit kenne, wissen, dass die trotz der schweren Prüfung, die ihnen auferlegt wurde, mit ganzer Seele und mit allen Kräften weiter den Kampf für die grosse Sache führen werden, der ihr Sohn seine Jugend und sein Leben gab.

Max Beer.

Dr. A. Tartakower, a member of the Executive Committee of the World Jewish Congress, and his wife Malwina, were advised by the War Department that their only son, nineteen-year-old Pfc. Jochanan was killed on September 29 in France “in action”.  With the parents, all their friends mourn for the high-spirited, loving young man, who was enthusiastically drawn to war, as an American and a Jew.

Jochanan Tartakower, born May 3, 1925 in Lodz, arrived in America in 1941 – where his father had been staying with the 1939 Geneva Zionist Congress, after the invasion of Poland in September – after an adventurous flight from Poland.  The mother, whom the war had also separated from her son, succeeded only four years later, through toilsome wandering over Russia and Palestine, to find him again in America.

But the family should stay a long time.  Jochanan, who studied engineering sciences at City College with brilliant success.  He was President of Habonim, and acquainted with Hebrew and Jewish knowledge like the parents, a short time after the arrival of the mother, entered the army and went to France.

All those who have known the splendid, distinguished young man loved him, said a brilliant friend of Arieh and Malwina Tartakower, who knew the tireless work of the couple for the cause of Judaism and mankind, that despite the heavy trial which was imposed upon them, will continue the struggle for the great cause, for which her son gave his youth and his life.

Max Beer

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The next appearance of Jochanan’s name was in The Jewish Chronicle (and Jewish News, of Detroit) on November 3, 1944.  On that day, the Chronicle published a casualty list which included Jochanan’s name, an exception to the Chronicle’s practice of limiting military casualty (and award) lists to names of servicemen specifically in the armed forces of the British Commonwealth.  Jochanan’s name, which appears near the end of the list, was probably included due to his father’s prominence in Jewish affairs.

Information about some of the men in the above list appears below….

Died of Wounds
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Chenovitch, Barnet, Pte., 6150664, Somerset Light Infantry, Suffolk Regiment, 2nd Battalion
Died of Wounds June 7, 1944, Imphal-Kohima, Burma
Mr. and Mrs. Solomon and Yetta Chenovitch (parents), 1 Eastdown House, Amhurst Road, Hackney, London, E8, England
Born 1921
Imphal War Cemetery, India – 1, B, 10
The Jewish Chronicle 11/3/44
We Will Remember Them I – 70

Dubinsky, William Henry, Pvt., H/200121, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps, Calgary Highlanders
Died of Wounds 8/13/44
Mr. and Mrs. Shiyah and Eva (Weinman) Dubinsky (parents), 282 Selkirk Ave. / 222 Pritchard Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Born in Russia 6/26/14
Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery, Calvados, France – XII, H, 9
The Jewish Chronicle 11/3/44
Canadian Jews in World War II II – p. 20

Schwartz, William, Gunner, B/138564, Royal Canadian Artillery, 3rd Field Regiment
Died of Wounds 9/4/44
Mr. Sam Schwartz (father), Room 1104, Ford Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Montecchio War Cemetery, Italy – III, B, 16
The Jewish Chronicle 11/3/44
Canadian Jews in World War II II – 20

Trocki, Adolf, 2 Lt., 05336, Polish Army West, Cavalry, 1 Polska Dywizja Pancerna, 10 Brygada Kawalerii Pancernej, 24 Pułk Ułanów im.
Killed in Action 8/16/44
France, Calvados, Jort
Born in Vilno, Poland, 3/24/15
Platoon commander, killed in tank.; Engineer; Information from SGA “Sepultures de Guerre” web site.  Not in SGA “Seconde guerre mondiale” database.; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Armoured_Division_%28Poland%29
http://home.concepts.nl/~avalphen/lari/lan.t.htm#2566
Cimetiere militaire “Langannerie”, Grainville-Langannerie, Calvados, France – Tombe individuelle, Carre Plot V, Rang A, No. 3 (Initially buried at M.R. 7F/4 246406)
The Jewish Chronicle 11/3/44
Jewish Military Casualties in the Polish Armies in World War II – 121

Wounded in Action

Abramovitz, Hymie, Pte., B/155273, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps, The Black Watch
Wounded 7/24/44
Mr. Samuel Abramovitz (father), Toronto, Ontario, Canada
The Jewish Chronicle 9/29/44, 11/3/44
Canadian Jews in World War II – 85

Besserman
, Irvin, Pte., B/142219, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps, The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment)

Wounded 8/27/44
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan and Bessie Besserman (parents), 64 Montrose Ave., Toronto, Ontario, Canada
The Jewish Chronicle 11/3/44
Canadian Jews in World War II – 10, 86

Blustein
, Philip, Pte., D/86038, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps, Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment

Wounded three times: @ 8/15/43 (Sicily), @ 7/15/44 (Italy), and @ 9/15/44 (Italy)
Mrs. Yetta Blustein (mother), 2195 Wilson Ave., Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Born 1920
The Jewish Chronicle 11/19/43, 11/3/44
Canadian Jews in World War II – 88

Bogo
, Maurice, Gunner, B/21909, Royal Canadian Artillery

Wounded 9/8/44
(Wife), 41 Essex St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada
The Jewish Chronicle 11/3/44
Canadian Jews in World War II – 88

Prisoner of War

Greenblatt, Chanan David, CQMS, B/46386, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps, Argyle and Southern Highlanders
Captured 8/27/44; POW at Stalag 357
Miss S. Greenblatt (sister), 3327 Dundas St., West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Born in Toronto
The Jewish Chronicle 11/3/44
Canadian Jews in World War II II – 124

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Some other Jewish military casualties on Friday, September 29, 1944 – when Jochanan was killed in action – include…

Killed in Action
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Adler, Sheldon L., 2 Lt., 0-820188, Co-Pilot, Air Medal, Purple Heart
Mr. and Mrs. Louis and Minerva Adler (parents), Doris Adler (sister), 38 Fort Washington St., New York, N.Y.
Born 1925
Casualty List 1/25/45
New York Times Obituary section 10/29/44

American Jews in World War II – 264

Dragoon, Samuel, T/Sgt., 12041050, Flight Engineer, Air Medal, Purple Heart
Mrs. Frances R. Dragoon (wife), c/o S. Jaffe, 2000 Vyse Ave., New York, N.Y.
Mrs. Rose Dragoon (mother); T/Sgt. Max Dragoon (brother), 1326 Washington Ave., Bronx, N.Y.
Casualty List 12/15/44
Jewish Criterion (Pittsburgh) 9/20/46

American Jews in World War II – 298

(Sergeant Dragoon’s brother, T/Sgt. Max Dragoon, a member of the 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, was killed in action 26 days earlier: On September 3, 1944.  His name appeared in Casualty Lists released on October 8 and November 11, 1944.  Awarded the Silver Star and Purple Heart with one Oak Leaf Cluster, he is buried at the American Cemetery, in Epinal, France – (Plot A, Row 15, Grave 33).)

Sheldon Adler and Samuel Dragoon were crewmen aboard B-24H Liberator 41-29439, “GALLOPIN GHOST” (“6L * K”); of the 787th Bomb Squadron, 466th Bomb Group, 8th Air Force, the loss of which is covered in MACR 15774.  The plane was piloted by 1 Lt. Marshall K. Lewis, and crashed near Lyancourt, France, while returning to its base from a trucking mission to Saint Dizier, France.  According to the MACR, the crash was caused by the simultaneous failure of all four engines: “reason unknown”.  There were no survivors among the aircraft’s six crewmen.  The entire crew – Lt. Adler, T/Sgt. Dragoon, Sgt. Wilbur R. Hain (Observer – from Goodspring, Pa.), 1 Lt. Marshall K. Lewis (Pilot – from Forth Worth, Tx.), T/Sgt. Paul E. Miller (Radio Operator – from San Bernardino, Ca.), and 2 Lt. Herbert F. Minard (Navigator – from Wichita, Ks.) – was buried in a collective plot (Section 82, Grave 125) at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, in Saint Louis, Missouri, on October 3, 1949.

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This excellent image (UPL 7610) of the Ghost’s nose art, from the American Air Museum website, shows the crew of pilot Lt. Dorsey L. Baker (standing at left), who completed 32 missions, 30 with the 784th Bomb Squadron.  (The Ghost was assigned to the 784th (as “T9 * K“) before being allocated to the 787th Bomb Squadron.)

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This image, also from the American Air Museum website (UPL22744; contributed by Eric Foster), shows four of the airmen who were lost when the Ghost crashed in France on September 29, 1944, as well as other crewmen not aboard the plane on that mission.

Standing, left to right: S/Sgt. Owen Killborn, 2 Lt. Sheldon Adler (co-pilot; KIA 9/29), Lt. Caulk, T/Sgt. Paul E. Miller (radio operator; KIA 9/29), T/Sgt. Samuel Dragoon (flight engineer; KIA 9/29;), 1 Lt. Marshall K. Lewis (pilot; KIA 9/29).  Front row: S/Sgt. Dwight O. Foster, 2 Lt. Herbert F. Minard (navigator; KIA 9/29), S/Sgt. Thomasett, S/Sgt. Albert Spencer.

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Bloom, Rubin, PFC, 12014488, United States Army, Purple Heart, 1 Oak Leaf Cluster
United States Army, 9th Infantry Division, 39th Infantry Regiment
(Wounded previously – @ 8/27/44)
Mrs. Rose Bloom (mother), 1746 Bathgate Ave., Bronx, N.Y.
Born 1918
Montefiore Cemetery, Springfield, Queens, N.Y.
Casualty Lists 10/27/44, 1/10/45
American Jews in World War II – 280

Bondas
, Lazar Yakovlevich [Бондас, Лазар Яковлевич], Captain [Капитан]

U.S.S.R., Red Army
39th Tank Brigade; Assistant Commander (Headquarters)
Wounded 9/29/44; Died of wounds at 1141st Evacuation Hospital on 12/24/44
Born 1913, Ryazan, Ryazan Oblast
Aron Yakovlevich Bondas (brother)
Memorial Book of Jewish Soldiers Who Died in Battles Against Nazism – 1941-1945 – Not Listed
[Книги Памяти еврееввоинов, павших в боях с нацизхмом в 1941-1945гг – нет в списке]

Cravetz
, Paul P., T/4, 32132780, United States Army, Purple Heart
United States Army, 4th Armored Division, 25th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized)
Mr. Benjamin Cravetz (father), 312 Seneca St., Fulton, N.Y.
Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France – Plot C, Row 8, Grave 45
Daily Sentinel (Rome, N.Y.) 1/25/45
Syracuse Herald-Journal 1/28/42
American Jews in World War II – 294


Glickerman
, Sam Jack, PFC, 36643868, United States Army, Purple Heart

United States Army, 36th Infantry Division, 142nd Infantry Regiment, C Company
Mr. and Mrs. Efrom and Rose Glickerman (parents), 1403 S. Tripp St., Chicago, Il.
Born 2/22/22
Cemetery location unknown
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/czea008.html American Jews in World War II – 100

Goldsmith
, Sidney W., Pvt., 32988824, United States Army, Purple Heart

United States Army, 91st Infantry Division, 363rd Infantry Regiment
Mrs. Anna Goldsmith (wife), 1171 Morrison Ave., Bronx, N.Y.
Born 1/13/18
Workmen’s Circle #281 Cemetery, Glen Wild, N.Y.
Casualty List 12/15/44
American Jews in World War II – 327

Greenberger
, Marvin H., Pvt., 42079049, United States Army, Purple Heart

4th Armored Division, 51st Armored Infantry Battalion
Mrs. Sadie G. Greenberger (mother), 2825 Grand Concourse, Bronx, N.Y.
Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France – Plot C, Row 6, Grave 45
Casualty List 1/10/45
American Jews in World War II – 335

Hora
, Raymond E., PFC, 16177224, United States Army, Purple Heart, 1 OLC

United States Army, 36th Infantry Division, 141st Infantry Regiment, B Company
Mrs. Lillian Hora (mother), 18667 Cherrylawn St., Detroit, Mi.
Born 1919
Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France – Plot A, Row 8, Grave 39
American Jews in World War II – 191

Kantor
, Lev (Leonid) Moiseevich (Mikhaylovich) [Кантор, (Лев (Леонид) Моисеевич (Михайлович)], Junior Lieutenant [Младший Лейтенант], 53 combat missions

U.S.S.R., Military Air Forces – VVS
Aerial Gunner – Bombardier
561st Autonomous Army Aviation Squadron

Aircraft type unknown – probably U-2 , Po-2, Pe-2, or Il-4
Born 1912
Memorial Book of Jewish Soldiers Who Died in Battles Against Nazism – 1941-1945 – Not Listed
[Книги Памяти еврееввоинов, павших в боях с нацизхмом в 1941-1945гг – нет в списке]

Szwarfurter
, Pinchas, Pvt., Polish People’s Army, at Poland, Warsaw-Brodno

6th Infantry Regiment
Mr. Szymcha Szwarfuter (father)
Born Slovakia, Zilinda, Konska; 1919
Powazkowska Street Cemetery, Warsaw-Zoliborz, Mazowieckie, Poland
Jewish Military Casualties in the Polish Armies in World War 2 – Volume I – 69

Wounded in Action

Kelner, Irving, Cpl., B/40965, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Lincoln and Welland Regiment
Mr. and Mrs. Israel and Molly Kelner (parents); Norman, David, Morris, and Ruth (siblings), 410 Parliament St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Casualty List (USA) 11/29/44
The Jewish Chronicle 1/12/45
Canadian Jews in World War II, Volume II – 42, 102

Silverman
, Leo, Cpl., K/57228, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps

Canadian Scottish Regiment
(mother) 2033 Bennings Road, Washington, D.C.; (cousin), 1307 S. McBride St., Syracuse, N.Y.
Residence also at Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
The Jewish Chronicle 12/1/44
Canadian Jews in World War II, Volume II – 115

Vosberg
, Mickey Herman, Gunner, D/138332, Royal Canadian Artillery

(parents), 5587 Esplanade Ave., Montreal, Quebec, Canada
The Jewish Chronicle 12/1/44
Canadian Jews in World War II, Volume II – 117

Weinstein
, Samuel H., 1 Lt., United States Army, Wounded by shrapnel in leg (in Germany)

Mrs. Esther Weinstein (mother), George and Meyer (brothers), 68-33 76th St., Middle Village, N.Y.
Born 1910
Casualty List 12/3/44
Long Island Daily Press 12/2/44
American Jews in World War II – Not listed

Woolner
, Jack, PFC, United States Army (in France)

Mr. Harry Woolner (father), 1907 E. Firth St., Philadelphia, Pa.
Born 1921
Philadelphia Record 11/12/44
American Jews in World War II – Not listed

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Then, news about Jochanan appeared in the November 10 issue of The American Hebrew…

American Hebrew – November 10, 1944

Jews in Uniform

Unhappy Ending.

Jochanan Tartakower, born in 1925, in Lodz, Poland, escaped from Poland in 1939.  Alone he traveled to Russia and the Orient, arriving in New York from Japan several years later, to be re-united with his father, Dr. Arieh Tartakower, head of the Relief Department of the World Jewish Congress, who, being one of the leaders of the Polish Jewish Community, was well known to the Nazis and was on the Gestapo list for early capture.  Dr. Tartakower had been able to elude the Nazis at the outset of hostilities and had succeeded in reaching the United States, without his family.  Mrs. Tartakower, Jochanan’s mother, was detained and only succeeded in rejoining her family long after Jochanan’s arrival in America.  The happy re-united family were enjoying life here in New York.  Jochanan, the only child of the Tartakowers, attended C.C.N.Y. School of Engineering, where he was an honor student.  He was active as President of Habonim, a Zionist youth group in New York, and had a host of friends.  He joined Uncle Sam’s fighting forces at the age of 18 and was assigned to the infantry.  He was sent to the European theatre of operations to meet his old enemies, the Nazis, this time on more equal terms, as a well equipped fighting man.

Dr. Tartakower recently received a telegram from the War Department:  “We regret to advise you that your son, Private First Class Jochanan Tartakower, A.U.S., has been killed in action on September 29, 1944.”

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Fittingly; appropriately; movingly, Arieh memorialized his son in his next book:  The Jewish Refugee, which was published by the Institute of Jewish Affairs of the AJC (American Jewish Congress) and WJC (World Jewish Congress).  The title and dedicatory pages of The Jewish Refugee are shown below:

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In 1947, Jochanan’s name appeared in Volume II – the state-by-state directory of casualties and award recipients – of the two-volume American Jews in World War II.  (The reference work has been cited in many of my prior posts, and will be mentioned wherever pertinent for future blog entries.)  Here is the cover…

…while Jochanan’s name appears on page 459, appropriately under “New York”.  This page is representative of the presentation of names in American Jews in World War II:  Likely due to the sheer number of entries – 38,888 – based on information recorded by the National Jewish Welfare Board (NJWB) – information is limited to names, ranks, military awards, city or town of residence, and casualty status (killed in action, or killed – non-battle).  Though the NJWB index cards typically include names of next of kin, home addresses, and sometimes serial numbers, military theater of action, and date when a serviceman was a casualty, none of this latter (invaluable) information was ever published.

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The following essay appeared in a publication entitled Furrows, a publication of Ichud Habonim (the Labor-Zionist youth movement), in November of 1944.  Its very title – F u r r o w s – visually connoted farming; plowing; soil; land – while “kvutza” denoted “communal settlement” prior to Israel’s 1948 re-establishment.  Furrows was published in New York City between 1942 and 1964. 

ADVENTURE IN PIONEERING
JOHANAN TARTAKOWER

“Johanan Tartakower was killed in action in the European Theater of Operations on September 29th, 1944. He was one of our best haverim.’’

He was my friend, too – that is why these words are meaningless to me.  I cannot transform and reduce this intangible thing into pitifully inadequate sentences.  I can only wonder at the empty space that is left in my life and try to fill it with memories of Johanan and of the days we spent at Kvutza, of the work we did when he was my rosh mahaneh, of the dreams we had together of Eretz Yisrael and “our” kibbutz.

And I can say with a determination which I have never felt, before that we must not let the chain of halutzim be broken.  We must fill the gap.  We must believe in the things Johanan died for and fight for them.  Freedom and peace are meaningless if we are not conscious of their worth and do not accept their responsibilities – and freedom and peace must prevail lest future Johanans shall die, lest the Jewish people never find their future.

I shall endeavor to do what my friend Johanan wanted to do – I will try to realize his dreams.  That is the best tribute I can give him, and I call to all those others who believe as Johanan did to rouse themselves, to accept the task of the halutz, so that the vision of which Johanan was symbolic shall find new strength and fervor.

Harry Brumberger
Furrows, November, 1944

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In September of 1985, a Conference Room named in Yochanan’s honor was opened at Kibbutz Kfar Blum, in northern Israel.  The images show the ribbon cutting (by Jochanan’s mother, Malwina?), Arieh affixing a commemorative plaque upon the Conference Room’s entrance, the Conference Room itself (where Jochanan’s photographic portrait – the image atop this post – is displayed), music played at the ceremony – with Dr. Tartakower contemplatively resting his head upon his hand – and next, presenting a speech, while Malwina watches from the audience.

 

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It is ironic, considering the scope of Arieh’s academic and literary oeuvre, that history gave Jochanan so very little opportunity and time to record his own thoughts, and eventually, perhaps, arrive at his own understanding of “the world”. 

Still, two short fragments of his writing, apparently preserved and incorporated by a friend – “B.K.” – within correspondence or a newsletter of the Labor Zionist movement, are still extant, and are presented (in italics) below.  Given that these were penned while Jochanan was no more than nineteen years old, they reveal a man wise beyond his very few years; intellectually and morally conscious of the nature of the era in which he was living, as a Jew, an American soldier, and a hopeful pioneer in the re-establishment of a Jewish state. 

Perhaps his others correspondence – V-mail? – hand-written letters? – still exists, somewhere.   If and until they are discovered, let these small passages speak for him:

It was a great blow to us when we learned that Yochanan was killed in action in France.  Indeed, those of us who knew him well, who worked and lived with him in Habonim, found it very difficult to force ourselves to realise that Yochanan was no longer with us, would not be on the chava with us, and would never live and work together with us as chalutzim in our kibbutz in Aretz,

To say that Yochanan was one of the best chavorim in New York and also one of the finest and most sincere chalutzim in the movement would be superfluous.  To those of us who knew him, however, these words have real significance in our memories. We remember that summer in Killingworth shortly after he came to this country, memories of putting up ohalim together, moving the tent platforms up to the Bonim Kikar, siphoning gasoline from one vehicle to another, singing around the Medura.  We remember him working more actively than most of us in the New York Galil and especially in the Manhattan Machaneh of which he was a driving force, though not a very loquacious one.  Especially we remember him as part of our present K.A. group which meant so much to him.  We see him sitting at K.A. meetings in the office or in some cafeteria, where long-winded debates on chalutziut were often held.  During these debates, he was usually silent, but when he did speak it was apparent that he, more than the rest of us knew what chalutziut means.  To him it had for a long time been his whole life.

It just does not seem fair that Yochanan should have been killed.  He had gone through so much.  His family was separated during the occupation of Poland.  His father, Aryeh Tartakower, a prominent Zionist leader, came to America first.  It was only in 1942 that Yochanan managed to reach the United States after a long and dangerous journey.  His mother finally arrived here shortly before he went into the Army.  To Yochanan, therefore, this war was very real and very important, not only because he was more deeply aware of the issues and the character of the enemy, but also because he saw things through the eyes of a chalutz.  It was only after his death that we learned that he could have been withdrawn to a desk job because of his knowledge of languages but that he refused the offer because, as ho told his commanding officer, he came to Europe to fight.  In a letter from England he wrote:

“….for the past few years I have been preparing myself mentally for that event, and now I feel that the hour is coming when I, in my small way, will avenge the crimes committed.  And I think in my place, being an infantryman, I will get my best chance.  I think a lot about the movement and about Aretz; it is curious how war can influence your thinking, and being in the army and fighting even more.”

Yes, he thought a lot about the movement and about Aretz.  To be a chalutz in Aretz was his goal in life.  Sometimes he would be sad because of the thought that he might never achieve this goal.  But throughout the time that he was in the Service, he always thought about K.A., was writing constantly to chaverim, demanding news on how the K.A. was developing, and making the problems of the K.A. his problems no matter how far away and isolated he was.

In a letter written just a few days before his death, after having gone through the thick of all the fighting in France, he wrote:

“I have thought of it constantly and as far as I am concerned all the hardships and risks I have gone through made me only a better chalutz, and above all more conscious of my immediate future.  So, my theory is that ex-servicemen, after the war is over, will make a hell of a lot better chalutzim than anybody else, for the simple reason that they have changed their mode of living once already and are not afraid to do it again.”

It is with tears in our eyes that we bid farewell to Yochanan, our chaver.  We will try to live up to his standards of chalutzic character, to his devotion and self-sacrifice.  We promise to avenge Yocbanan in the way he would have liked it, with a larger aliyah from our movement to Aretz, with fields which we shall reclaim and cultivate in his memory, and with houses and farm buildings which we shall build on our soil.  Though he is gone, we know that Yochanan will be with us always as an inspiration during the difficult times that lie ahead in accomplishing the great task which was to him life itself. – B.K

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Jochanan’s matzeva at Long Island National Cemetery in Suffolk County, New York, photographed by FindAGrave contributor Glenn.

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An aerial view of Kfar Blum – photographed by Ofir Ben Tov – in Israel’s Upper Galilee.  The view looks south, with the tree-lined Jordan River winding between the Kibbutz and the two center-pivot irrigation circles to its east.  The Sea of Galilee lies in the distance.

The land is furrowed.  The land, is green.

Acknowledgements

I would like to extend my sincere and grateful appreciation to Annette Fine and Yonatan Porat, of Kibbutz Kfar Blum, for their generosity in sharing material – particularly photographs – pertaining to Jochanan and his parents.  Without their assistance, “this” post would not have been possible.  

References

Books

Dublin, Louis I., and Kohs, Samuel C., American Jews in World War II – The Story of 550,000 Fighters for Freedom, The Dial Press, New York, N.Y., 1947

Morris, Henry, Edited by Gerald Smith, We Will Remember Them – A Record of the Jews Who Died in the Armed Forces of the Crown 1939 – 1945, Brassey’s, United Kingdom, London, 1989

Morris, Henry, Edited by Hilary Halter, We Will Remember Them – A Record of the Jews Who Died in the Armed Forces of the Crown 1939 – 1945 – An Addendum, AJEX, United Kingdom, London, 1994

Canadian Jews in World War II – Part I: Decorations, Canadian Jewish Congress, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 1948

Canadian Jews in World War II – Part II: Casualties, Canadian Jewish Congress, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 1948.

Memorial Book of Jewish Soldiers Who Died in Battles Against Nazism – 1941-1945 – Volumes I through XI, Maryanovskiy, M.F., Pivovarova, N.A., Sobol, I.S. (editors), Union of Jewish War Invalids and Veterans, Moscow, Russia, 1994 – 2014

Websites

Aryeh Tartakower (at Wikipedia)

Arieh Tartakower (at Jewish Virtual Library)

Aryeh Tartakower Dead at 85 (at Jewish Telegraphic Agency)

Furrows (New York Public Library catalog record)

Kfar Blum Volunteers (at Goalweb.com)

Pastoral Hotel – Kfar Blum (at KfarBlum-Hotel.co.il.)

Soldiers from New York: Jewish Soldiers in The New York Times, in World War Two: Private Marc C. Dauber

The name of Private Marc C. Dauber, a resident of Brooklyn, appeared in The New York Times on February 4, 1945, in a list of soldiers killed in action in the European Theater of War.  His obituary – shown below – was published on September 26 of that year.

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Second Highest Honor Awarded Him After Death

The nation’s second highest honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, was awarded posthumously yesterday to Pvt. Marc C. Dauber, 22 years old, a Brooklyn soldier who was killed in action in the Huertgen Forest at Hamich, Germany, after twice leaving “safe” Army assignments to get into front-line action.

At a ceremony at 90 Church Street, Col. John R. Reitmeyer, Public Relations Officer of the Eastern Defense Command, presented the award to the soldier’s father, Emanuel Dauber of 1574 Fifty-Sixth Street, Brooklyn.  Private Dauber was killed last November while serving with Company L of the Sixteenth Infantry Regiment, of the First Division.  Badly wounded in a German counter-attack, he defended his position until he was killed, shouting and throwing grenades, and drawing enemy fire away from the rest of his platoon.

He had left his engineer camouflage unit to stow away on a landing barge, for the D-Day landing.

Assigned to a desk job in Brittany, he again transferred himself to the infantry unit, and served so well that his commanding officer requested his official transfer.

Before entering the Army he was a senior at Brooklyn College.

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The official citation for Private Dauber’s DSC award, available at Military Times Hall of Valor, states:

A member of 3rd Battalion, L Company, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, he was killed in action on November 18, 1944.  A recipient of the Distinguished Service Cross, the citation for his award states, “During action near Hamich, Germany, Private Dauber assumed command of his platoon when the platoon and squad leaders became casualties. He led a group of men into the town, silenced a German machine gun with a grenade, courageously advanced alone on a second machine gun nest and eliminated that position with rifle fire. He continued to lead his men until nightfall when the enemy counterattacked and surrounded his platoon. Although seriously wounded he defended his position with heroic determination against overwhelming odds until he was killed. Private Dauber’s inspirational leadership and supreme devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.”

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Born in Germany on October 24, 1922, Private Dauber is buried at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, in Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, in Grave 18, Row 6, Plot B.  A photograph of his tombstone, by WW II military history researcher Des Philippet, can be found at his biographical profile, at FindAGrave.com.

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A late-2016 Google view of the residence of Marc and his parents – Emanuel (a veteran of the German Army in WW I) and Pauline – in the Borough Park section of Brooklyn, appears below.

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Some other Jewish military casualties on Saturday, November 18, 1944 include…

Killed in Action
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Egel, Ely, PFC, 37619938, Purple Heart
United States Army, 26th Infantry Division, 101st Infantry Regiment
Mr. and Mrs. Simone and Minnie Egel (parents), 956 Hamilton Ave., St. Louis, Mo.; Mr. Sam Goldblatt (best friend), St. Louis, Mo.
Place of burial unknown
Saint Louis Post Dispatch 3/5/45
American Jews in World War Two – 209

Ellman
, Alan H., Pvt., 32978581, Purple Heart

United States Army, 95th Infantry Division, 377th Infantry Regiment
Dr. Isadore William Ellman (father), 701 Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, N.Y.
Born 1924
Place of burial unknown
American Jews in World War Two – 302

Emmer, Raymond Philip, Pvt., 37618928, Purple Heart
United States Army, 99th Infantry Division, 394th Infantry Regiment, F Company
Mr. and Mrs. Vivien Horace and Blanche (Nathan) Emmer (parents), 6304 Rosemary Drive, St. Louis, Mo.
Born Saint Louis, Mo., 4/6/25
American Jews in World War Two – 209

Raymond P. Emmer and Carol Strauss, at Beverly Hills, California, in 1942.  (Photo c/o Robert Alyn)

Fried, Louis, Pvt., 35233154, Purple Heart, Casualty in France
United States Army, 95th Infantry Division, 379th Infantry Regiment
Mr. Samuel Fried (father), 139 Roslyn Drive, Youngstown, Oh.
Born 1923
Place of burial unknown
The Jewish Times (Youngstown, Ohio) 12/22/44
American Jews in World War II – 486

Kaufman
, Arthur S., Pvt., 32525103

United States Army, 32nd Infantry Division, 32nd Signal Company
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer and Mollie Kaufman (parents); Irvin and Norman (brothers), 1735 Walton Ave., Bronx, N.Y.
Born 1921; City College of New York Class of 1942
Place of burial unknown
Casualty List 2/6/45
New York Times obituary page (Memorial Section) 11/17/46
American Jews in World War II – 47, 359

Schlamowitz
, Milton, Pvt., 32803627, Purple Heart, Casualty in Germany

United States Army, 29th Infantry Division, 116th Infantry Regiment, B Company
Mrs. Jennie Schlamowitz (mother), Herbert (brother), 1234 Vyse Ave., New York, N.Y.
Born 1925
Place of burial unknown
Casualty List 3/6/45
American Jews in World War II – 431

Schor
, William, PFC, 42056382, Purple Heart, 1 Oak Leaf Cluster, Casualty in France

United States Army, 103rd Infantry Division, 411th Infantry Regiment, Anti-Tank Company
Died of Wounds 12/5/44
Mrs. Mina R. Schor (mother), 3640 (3650?) Rochambeau Ave., New York, N.Y.
Place of burial unknown
Casualty List 1/28/45
American Jews in World War II – 433

Sussman
, Daniel, Pvt., 36727698

United States Army, 95th Infantry Division, 377th Infantry Regiment
Mr. and Mrs. Charles and Bess (Kaiserman) Sussman (parents), Chicago, Il.; Mrs. Thelma Friedman (sister)
Westlawn Cemetery, Norridge, Chicago, Il. (Buried August, 1949)
Chicago Tribune 8/4/49
American Jews in World War II – 118

Wiesen
, Fred R., PFC, 18151571, Purple Heart, Casualty in France

United States Army
Mr. and Mrs. Alex and Ruth Wiesen (parents), New York, N.Y. / Orleans Parrish, La.
Mrs. Estelle (Wiesen) Levine (sister), Harold and Lois (?); Lenore and Milton, Seasonwein; Gertrude and Arthur Holzsager; Naomi Hicks; Fred and Clara Penner; Carl, Julius, Charlotte, and Harold
Place of burial unknown (Buried 5/21/48)
New York Times Obituary page 5/20/48, 5/21/48, 5/22/48;
New York Times Obituary page Memorial section: 11/18/45, 11/24/26
American Jews in World War II – 472

Died of Wounds
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Captain Wallace Nathan Emmer, USAAF (brother of Raymond Philip Emmer), Capt., 0-730422
United States Army Air Force, 9th Air Force, 354th Fighter Group, 353rd Fighter Squadron
138 combat missions
Silver Star
Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished Service Cross,
Air Medal with 24 Oak Leaf Clusters
Purple Heart
Born Omaha, Nebraska, 11/18/17
Shot down by flak 8/9/44; Prisoner of war; Died 2/15/45 at Wetzlar / Lahn, Klosterwald, Germany, of a heart attack, from effects of severe burns received when his Mustang was shot down.
MACR 8149, P-51D 44-13948, No Luftgaukommando Report
American Jews in World War Two – Not listed

Unlike all other soldiers listed in this post, Captain Wallace N. Emmer was not a casualty on November 18, 1944.  Information about him is presented here because he was Private Raymond P. Emmer’s brother. 

Raymond and Wallace are among the numerous sets of brothers profiled in Helen Kantzler’s article “Double Gold Stars”, which was published in the Jewish Criterion (Pittsburgh) on September 20, 1946.  The Emmer brothers were buried alongside one another at New Mount Sinai Cemetery, in Saint Louis, Missouri, on April 21, 1948.  (Section Q, Lot 25)   For more information about Raymond and Wallace, visit their biographical profile (by Trip Alyn) at FindAGrave.com.

The image below, reproduced from a photographic print loaned to me by Robert Alyn, shows Wallace’s personal P-51D, “Arson’s Reward”.  Very (very, very!) close magnification of that photographic print showed that this aircraft’s serial number is 44-13400.      

According to the Aviation Archeology database, 44-13400 was wrecked in a landing accident Criqueville, France, on August 3, 1944, while being flown by Franklin Rose, Jr.  This was six days before Captain Emmer was shot down in P-51D 44-13948. 

Though low resolution, the image below, from the book History in the Sky: 354th Pioneer Mustang Fighter Group, clearly shows the wreck of “Arson’s Reward”.  The picture shows the plane’s nickname on its forward cowling.  (Plus, a rather broken left wing.)

Notice that while the photo above shows the plane with 11 crosses denoting German planes shot down, the image below shows 16 crosses.  Based on the dates (in USAF Historical Study 85) of Emmer’s 13 full-credit and two half-credit aerial victories, this suggests that the above photograph was probably taken in very late June through mid-July of 1944.

Therefore, it seems that 44-13948 – the aircraft in which Wallace Emmer was shot down – was not “Arson’s Reward” and thus, not his “personal” Mustang.

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Since information about Captain Emmer abundantly exists in digital and print formats, the following two pictures are included here as representative images.

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This superb photograph shows Captain Emmer standing before a P-51B Mustang fighter, at the 354th Fighter Group’s base at Boxted, England.  Curiously, it is not an official USAAF photograph.  Instead, it was obtained through Britain’s Imperial War Museum, where it has been cataloged as image EA18248.  It may have been taken by Childs & Coxey Photographers, who apparently visited Boxted for a photo session early in 1944.

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This photograph, of Raymond and Wallace’s parents, Vivien Horace and Blanche (Nathan) Emmer, accompanied by Robert Alyn, was taken in Saint Louis on July 14, 1951.  They passed away within a day of one another in October, 1975.  (Image c/o Robert Alyn.) 

Wounded in Action

Burstein, Charles, 2 Lt., 0-1822586, Purple Heart
United States Army, 702nd Tank Destroyer Battalion
Mrs. Mary Burstein (mother), 1002 Keniston Ave., Los Angeles, Ca.
Casualty List 1/31/45
American Jews in World War Two – 286

Friedenwald
, Aaron, Capt., Silver Star, Purple Heart

United States Army, 29th Infantry Division
Miss Dorothy Lane (fiancée)
Dr. and Mrs. Edgar B. Friedenwald (parents), 1616 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md.
Baltimore Sun 1/21/45, 1/26/45
Jewish Times (Baltimore) 2/2/45
American Jews in World War Two – 138

Epstein
, Herbert W., Pvt., 12225760, Purple Heart, Severely Wounded, France

United States Army,
Mr. Samuel S. Epstein (father), 229 Van Cortlandt Park Ave., Yonkers, N.Y.

Born 1925
Casualty List 1/31/45;
The Herald Statesman (Yonkers) 12/21/44

American Jews in World War Two – 303

Prisoners of War

Feier, Joseph Arthur, Pvt., 42109607
84th Infantry Division, 334th Infantry Regiment
Stalag 2B (Hammerstein)
Mrs. Elsie Feier (mother), 153 Grove St., Passaic, N.J.
Casualty Lists 4/6/45, 6/13/45
American Jews in World War Two – p. 232

Hanowitz
, Stanley, Pvt., 33588225

84th Infantry Division, 334th Infantry Regiment
Stalag 2A (Neubrandenburg)
Mrs. Rosita Hanowitz (wife), 601 West 163rd St., New York, N.Y.
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Albert and Frances Hanowitz (parents), 5058 F Street, Philadelphia, Pa.
Born Philadelphia, Pa., 4/26/24
The Jewish Exponent 4/13/45; The Philadelphia Inquirer 4/5/45, 6/10/45; The Philadelphia Record 1/23/45, 4/5/45
American Jews in World War Two – Not listed

Sackter, Arnold M., Pvt., 36864894
26th Infantry Division, 104th Infantry Regiment
Stalag 12A (Limburg an der Lahn)
Mr. Jacob Sackter (father), 3824 Humphrey St., Detroit, Mi. / 446 1/2 North Curson, Los Angeles, Ca.
Casualty Lists 5/4/45, 6/19/45
American Jews in World War Two – Not listed

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References

Brown, Arthur F., History in the Sky: 354th Pioneer Mustang Fighter Group, San Angelo, Tx., 1946

Dublin, Louis I., and Kohs, Samuel C., American Jews in World War II – The Story of 550,000 Fighters for Freedom, The Dial Press, New York, N.Y., 1947.

The 16th Infantry: 1798 – 1946, Edited by Lieutenant John W. Baumgartner, 1st Sergeant Al De Poto, Sergeant William Fraccio, and Corporal Sammy Fuller

Brooklyn Eagle
, February 23, 1946, “96 Jewish Vets Get State Service Cross” (p. 2)

New York Post, October 6, 1945, “Parents Seek Word of Son” (p. 11)

New York Post, October 10, 1945, “Seek Word of Missing Relatives” (p. 11)

Military Times Hall of Valor – DSC Award for Private Marc C. Dauber, at
http://valor.militarytimes.com/recipient.php?recipientid=22028

USAF Credits for the Destruction of Enemy Aircraft, World War II, Albert F. Simpson Historical Research Center, Air University, Office of Air Force History, Headquarters USAF, 1978 (Wallace N. Emmer, pp. 60-61)

Soldiers from New York: Jewish Soldiers in The New York Times, in World War Two: First Lieutenant David Chrystall

First Lieutenant David Chrystall (0-452872), born in 1918, who served in the 550th Airborne Infantry Battalion, was killed in action in Belgium on January 4, 1945.  His name appeared in a Casualty List published on March 8 of that year, while his obituary – transcribed below – appeared in the Times a little over one year later: On January 6, 1946. 

He is buried at the Luxembourg American Cemetery, in Luxembourg, at Plot E, Row 8, Grave 41. 

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Officer Lost in Action With Airborne Infantry

The War Department has notified Maurice M. Chrystall of 311 East Seventy-Second Street, that his son, Lieut. David Chrystall of the airborne infantry, was killed in action in Belgium early in January.  He was 27 years old.

Born in New York City, he attended public schools in Paterson, N.J., and was graduated from Cornell University.  He enlisted in the Army in December, 1940, and attended the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Ga.  He later attended the Advanced Infantry School at Fort Benning and was promoted to a first lieutenancy.

In addition to his father he is survived by a sister, Mrs. Claire Seckler of Brooklyn.

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An image (from Apartments.com) of the building where the Chrystall family resided: 311 East 72nd Street, in New York City..

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Some other Jewish military casualties on Thursday, January 4, 1945…

Killed in Action
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Brafman, Arthur A., PFC, 42134385, Purple Heart, Killed in France
United States Army, 70th Infantry Division, 275th Infantry Regiment, C Company
Mr. Samuel Brafman (father [12/26/50]), 128 Bay 28th St., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Born 1926
New Montefiore Cemetery, West Babylon, N.Y. – Society Bayview Nemo B.A., Block 11, Row 16, Section 3, Grave 1R; Buried 1/10/49
American Jews in World War Two – 282

Cooperstein
, Abraham, Pvt., 32231143, Purple Heart, Killed on Leyte Island

United States Army, 242nd Engineer Combat Battalion
Mrs. Yetta Cooperstein (mother), 245 Kosciusko St., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines – Plot B, Row 13, Grave 101
American Jews in World War Two – 294

Fishman
, Stanley C., Sgt., 11138290, Silver Star, Purple Heart, Killed in Luxembourg

United States Army, 26th Infantry Division, 104th Infantry Regiment
Mr. Selig Fishman (father), 11 Colony Road, New Haven, Ct.
Born 7/30/25
Congregation B’Nai Jacob Cemetery, New Haven, Ct. – Plot AG4
The American Hebrew 3/30/45
American Jews in World War Two – 63

Haffits
, Joseph H., S/Sgt., 17066957, Purple Heart

United States Army, 4th Infantry Division, 8th Infantry Regiment
Mrs. Bertha Haffits (mother), 2603 Court St., Sioux City, Ia.
Born 1920
Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg – Plot E, Row 2, Grave 45
American Jews in World War Two – 126

Hoffman
, Joseph, S/Sgt., 32894589, Purple Heart

United States Army, 45th Infantry Division, 179th Infantry Regiment
Mr. Abraham Hoffman (father), 2102 Daly Ave., New York, N.Y.
Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France – Plot D, Row 6, Grave 18
Casualty List 3/1/45
American Jews in World War Two – 346

Jachman
, Isadore Siegfried, S/Sgt., 13136814, Medal of Honor, Purple Heart

United States Army, 17th Airborne Division, 513th Parachute Infantry Regiment, B Company
Mr. Leo Jachman (father), 2005 Whitter Ave., Baltimore, Md.
Born Berlin, Germany, 12/14/22
Hebrew Mount Carmel Cemetery, Adath Israel Anshe Sfarad Cemetery, Baltimore, Md.
American Jews in World War Two – 140
Images of Staff Sergeant Jachman’s matzeva can be found at his biographical profile at FindAGrave.com. 

Leshne
, Jerome, PFC, 32974066, Purple Heart

United States Army, 26th Infantry Division
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham and Lillian Leshne (parents), Seymour Leshne (brother), 1500 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Mr. Robert Lippin (“foxhole buddy”)
Beth David Cemetery, Elmont, N.Y.; Buried 8/22/48
Casualty List 3/13/45
The New York Times Obituary Page 8/22/48
American Jews in World War Two – 375

Wounded in Action

Erlick, Samuel, PFC, 13185920, BSM, Purple Heart, 1 Oak Leaf Cluster
United States Army, 26th Infantry Division, 104th Infantry Regiment, K Company
Also wounded 11/10/44
Mr. and Mrs. Harry and Eva (Borosh) Erlick (parents), 709 Hoffman St., Philadelphia, Pa.
Born Philadelphia, Pa., 6/24/24
American Jews in World War Two – Not listed

Silver, Alvin S., Pvt., 33577617, Purple Heart, 1 Oak Leaf Cluster, Wounded in Germany (Also wounded 3/28/45)
United States Army
Mrs. Rhoda Mae Silver (wife); Barbara Ann and Michael David (daughter and son), 1133 Cobbs St., Drexel Hill, Pa.
Mrs. Rose Bass (mother), 5701 Lebanon Ave., Philadelphia, Pa.
Born Philadelphia, Pa., 7/28/23
The Jewish Exponent (Philadelphia) 5/4/45
Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Record 4/21/45
American Jews in World War Two – 552

Prisoners of War

Cohen, Melvin, Pvt., 11047725, Purple Heart
United States Army, 550th Airborne Infantry Battalion
POW at Stalag 4B (Muhlberg)
Mrs. Lena Cohen (mother), 32 Coleman Road, Arlington, Ma.
Casualty List (Liberated POW) 6/13/45
American Jews in World War Two – 154

Goldberg
, Melvin I., Pvt., 12220289, Purple Heart

United States Army, 550th Airborne Infantry Battalion
POW at Stalag 4B (Muhlberg) (German POW # 98655)
Mr. Benjamin Goldberg (father), 58 Manhattan Ave., New York, N.Y.
Casualty List (Liberated POW) 6/20/45
American Jews in World War Two – 325

References

Dublin, Louis I., and Kohs, Samuel C., American Jews in World War II – The Story of 550,000 Fighters for Freedom, The Dial Press, New York, N.Y., 1947.

Email correspondence with Samuel Erlick, 2004-2006

 

New Guinea Passover: Letters from Wolfe Freudenheim, WW II – July, 1943

Some nine months after The Jewish Exponent’s publication of letters sent by Pvt. Wolfe V. Freudenheim to his parents in Philadelphia (see New Guinea New Year), the Exponent published more of Wolfe’s letters.  The first dealt with a Passover Seder held in New Guinea, and the second described the living conditions, climate, and wildlife (even the proverbial – and quite real! – bird of paradise) to be found on the island. 

This was the second (and last) occasion on which the Exponent published Pvt. Freudenheim’s letters.

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______________________________
____________________

Passover in New Guinea – Crocodile Hunting

The Jewish Exponent
July 9, 1943

Pvt. Wolfe Freudenheim, stationed in new Guinea, wrote the following letters to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Freudenheim of 6237 Christian Street.  Pvt. Freudenheim’s letters have appeared in THE EXPONENT before, and his latest batch is even more interesting.

____________________

New Guinea, April 29, 1943

Dearest Everybody,

I’m just returned from the Passover celebration here in New Guinea.  Rabbi Levy was there.  I had arrived at 7:30, and since the crowd was so large the service was discontinued in favor of eating.  All the men brought their own mess kits.  The dinner was served buffet style.  I can safely state that it was the largest grouping of any religious sect.  (Amount censored.)  It would have done your hearts good to see the men grabbing for “Matzos” and what wine there was.  I believe that every Jewish man in the Australian Army and U.S. forces was there.  Among those present: Lt. Max Daroff, Sgt. Herb Glonin, Eddie Eisenberg of Atlantic City.  I could just go on listing them, but it would sound like a roll call.  Pictures were taken by a war correspondent and also by the U.S. Army Photo section.

The Chaplain admitted that he never anticipated such a large mob.  For that reason the service was terminated and we spent the rest of the time meeting new people – and in general “swapping the best rumors”.

Naturally the “four questions” were asked, but they were never answered.  Undoubtedly they will be answered by the men in the forces in a different manner.  Next year we might be able to answer in peace.

Enough “Matzos” were on hand for every man to have at least one pound each.

Oh yes:  two nurses came.  Nobody looked at them – much.  First the upper strati of the commissioned officers held them enthralled.  A little later 1st and 2nd lieutenants took over.  Almost before anything else happened, a bunch of infantrymen, in their “zoot suits” (jungle uniforms) made a blank attack, and they never relinquished the hold they held – not even for the major, who wanted to take them “home”.  Over a box of “matzos” they spoke of “Seder” night at home.

In a corner a bunch had gotten together for a “go” at “Chad God Yah” – what a noise!  But it was beautiful.

Begging for order, the Chaplain called to the men for the benediction.  After reading an order from “the” General concerning the holiday, we left.

MENU
Matzo
Real Fruit Cocktail
Fresh Meat

WOLFE

____________________

New Guinea, May 13, 1943

Dearest Everybody:

“MY DAY OFF”
or
‘HOW NOT TO REST”

The morning was perfect, as _____ _____ days go, in New Guinea.  Of course it was hot, and the humidity was quite high.

[Being] my day off, I planned [to do] a bit of crocodile hunting on my own.  If I knew what was to transpire, I might have hesitated.

[By 4:15] A.M. I strapped a web belt about my waist, a canteen, jungle knife and a sharp dagger.  Slinging a bandolier and a rifle over my shoulder, then putting two packs of cigs in my pockets with a box of matches, plus four bars of chocolate, which was to be my lunch, I started out.

Hopping a ride was an easy matter, and after two hours we arrived at the habitat of the “crocs”.

Walking through this stinking swamp, down dried-up creeks and streams, was quite an experience.  The place was chockful of tracks and – being ever on the alert – deeper into this Eden I went.  Once I took a pot shot at a large snake, but he was too fast.  Lizards of the larger variety were to be found in abundance.  The reports which came from my rifle made them run in all directions.  Working my way up, I finally reached the summit of this mountain.  Here I met an English-speaking native policeman.  He was a swell fellow – offered me tea and biscuits.  The mountain was 5,000 feet.  Crocodiles?  “Oh, many miles up river, Towhada” (big white man).  He told me of the bird of paradise which roamed the nearby jungle – but telling me that it was against the law to shoot one.  He was quite emphatic about this.

Going back down into the jungle of this mountain took some time.  Then, part way down, I heard a chucking sound and saw a bush move – there walking across the track, not 25 yards away, was a real live bird of paradise in all his glory – strutting as though he were the kind of all he surveyed.  Gee, he was beautiful.  I couldn’t take my eyes off him.  About this time it began to rain, but slowly and quietly I followed my gorgeous friend.  Deeper and deeper into this heavy foliage he went, until he came to an overhanging boulder, under which was a round dry mound.  His lair!

The ground was becoming soggier, and it took quite and effort to pick up my foot, but quite a simply matter to put the other back in the goo.  Reaching into my pouch for a bar of chocolate, I soon found to my utter amazement that a whole colony of ants had beaten me to the draw.  Throwing the bars away, I dug deep into my pockets for a cigarette – only to find them all saturated by the rain, except one, which was only wet at the tip.  Breaking the wet part off, I put my hand into my pocket, and withdrew a broken match box and a few red dyed matches.  Their tips were gone.  Here a wallaby sloshed up the track and further on, I could see through the rain a few large rats.  By a lucky shot, I dropped one.  I noticed a curious feature about this animal – his front legs were much smaller than his hind legs!

I turned back, because it was getting colder and fog had started to close in.  Boy oh boy, how “the rains came”.  Never had I seen it like this before.  The going became tougher.  Hungry, the coveralls became heavier and now a headache started.  What a mess!

Coming onto the road, a truck picked me up, and at the pass we were stopped by an M.P., who advised us to walk because of landslides crossing the road at a few points.  Hitting the road again – road, did I say? – really only a wide mountain track over which cascaded new-made swirling streams, thundering over into an abyss.  Here a lorry was stuck in the mud and further down a boulder had come loose and planted itself in the middle of the track.  At last we made the bottom, where we found a small hospital.  We were fed warm soup and hot bully beef, which tasted just like steak – almost.  Outside a jeep had a flat tire.  I helped the fellow repair it and he took me to where I wanted to go. 

The rain had ceased at last.  Gee but my camp looked swell.  Home and bed!  What a comforting thought.  That last stretch – it looked like a concrete highway – that is, it looked like one, but in reality it wasn’t.  Taking a few steps, I fell into a deep mud hole.  My gun was just coated with mud, and when I opened the bolt the brown slimy stuff oozed out through the barrel.

I showered and crawled slowly into bed.  Then I thought – all the trouble – discomfort – the long trek – was it worth all I had seen and experienced.  I’ll say.

Love, WOLFE

New Guinea New Year: Letters from Wolfe Freudenheim, WW II – November, 1942

During the Second World War, Philadelphia’s The Jewish Exponent reported upon the military service of Jewish soldiers in a variety of ways.  These comprised brief and specific accounts – sometimes based on official documents – of a soldier’s experiences in combat or other activities; announcements about casualties (wounded, missing, prisoners, and deaths in combat), and, brief biographies.  These news items were often accompanied by photographic portraits, both formal and candid.

Curiously; oddly, despite the duration, scope, magnitude, and nature of the war, the Exponent published very few news items about military service that were genuinely “at length”.  However, the few news items of this nature that were published make fascinating and illuminating reading.

One such item follows below.  It’s comprised of letters written by two Philadelphia servicemen who were mutual acquaintances – Lieutenant Maxwell A. Daroff and PFC Wolfe Velvel Freudenheim – concerning life in New Guinea in late 1942.  Especially moving is their mention of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur services.

Though Lt. Freudenheim’s military unit is unknown, Lt. Daroff’s letter reveals that he was a member of the Army’s 440th Signal Battalion.  The Battalion, created in 1942 and eventually disbanded in 2008, served in the Second World War, the Korean War, and Iraq.

PFC Freudenheim, born in Media, Pennaylvania in January of 1914, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham and Mamie Freudenheim, his parents residing at 6237 Christian Street (Cobbs Creek section) in Philadelphia.  Married to Ruth V. Freudenheim at the time of his military service, the couple’s postwar address was 5850 Chestnut Street. 

Wolfe Freudenheim passed away in December of 1987.

In 1943, the Exponent published a second article comprised of letters penned by PFC Freudenheim.  That will appear in a future post.

____________________
______________________________
____________________

Local Jewish Boy Writes Home of His Experiences in New Guinea

Wolfe Freudenheim of West Philadelphia Now Stationed in the Pacific War Theatre
Relates Many Interesting Stories

The Jewish Exponent
November 6, 1942

Editor’s Notes: – Herewith is a series of letters written by Private Wolfe Freudenheim, to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Freudenheim of 6237 Christian Street.  Private Freudenheim is currently on duty in New Guinea, and although we’ve deleted certain personal passages, which we’re sure would be of no interest to the general public, there still remains in each letter a kaleidescopic report of life in that God forsaken island.  Some of the things he does, his emotions, and reactions may give you an idea of what some one very dear to you is undergoing.  The first letter is from another Philadelphia boy, Lt. Maxwell A. Daroff who left for New Guinea after Wolfe did, and then wrote Mrs. Freudenheim that he had met her son.  Some of the incidents are really exciting, especially the letter in which Wolfe describes the High Holiday services in New Guinea.

____________________

New Guinea
Sept. 19, 1942

Dear Mrs. Freudenheim:

Wolfe has most likely written and told you of our meeting ‘way over here.  I am sure that when you saw me that day on 63rd street and told me that Wolfe was in Australia you never even dreamed that in just a few short months I would be able to tell him about it.  This certainly is a small world.  When I left home I knew there were at least two people in Australia that I would know.  My brother and Wolfe.  I found my brother right off the bat.  We had quite a reunion and were together for some time.  However, we were separated again.  But that is war.  We are close enough, however, so that mail to each other gets through in a few days.  As for Wolfe, I had to wait until I got to this God-Forsaken place to find him.  I went to Rosh Hashonah services and there he was.  It so happened that I was the only officer present, so between us we conducted the services.  Me with my rank, and he with his knowledge, as limited as it was, although he remembered a little more than I did.  We had a pretty good service, too.

Earlier this month I wrote to my mother and told her about this.  I also gave her your phone number.  I have a very good memory for phone numbers.  So she may call you. 

I won’t try to tell you anything about this place.  I know Wolfe has already more than adequately described it.  However, if it will ease your mind any, I can tell you truthfully that Wolfe is in damned good health, fairly happy (we all want to get home) and not in any danger at all.  So don’t worry about him.  He will be all right and he knows how to take care of himself. 

Well, this is all.  Give my wishes for a happy and prosperous New Year to Mr. Freudenheim, Babe, Top, and Selma.

Sincerely,
Max.

____________________

Lt. Maxwell A. Daroff, 0-358639
1st Plat. Co. A 440 Sig. Bn.
(Const.) APO 929
c/o Postmaster, San Francisco

Sat., Sept. 12, 1942
New Guinea

Dearest Family:

“Le shonah tovo teeosevu (Hebrew).  [The word “Hebrew” was inserted by the writer for the benefit of the army censors. – Ed. Note.]

In the event that you didn’t receive my last greetings, which I wrote Thursday, services were held here in New Guinea – Friday night at 7 P.M.  Twenty-five men attended – including Lt. Max Daroff.  Really, you could have knocked me over with a pin.  Yep, he is here.  His brother, Lt. Sid Daroff, is in “Aussie”.  He told me about all of you, for which I am very much thankful.

Light night Max and I conducted, but today, at 9 A.M., 50 men were present – I did a solo.  The boys admitted that it was conducted quite well – (mind you, I know very little).

Incidentally, my tour of one week’s K.P. has ended – I am very thankful.  Pop’s package of Dunhills, razor blades, and matches came this P.M.  Gee, but they came in damm handy – all three items!

How I miss you all – you’ll never know.  Oh, yes, after services today Max, Sgt. Herb Glovin (who’s from Wynnefield) and I were talking about what we would be doing were we home.  Max and I agreed that we would be standing outside the West Phila. Com. Center.  Herb, undoubtedly would be at Horn and Hardart’s for coffee.  It was suddenly busted up when I had to wash 6 tubs and cut wood for the next fire.  Chopping with an axe, here, does one good.  Sweating profusely – is the main attraction.  But it really builds one’s shoulders and arm muscles.

It has been almost 10 days since I last heard from you.  We, here, haven’t gotten a thing, even from “Aussie”.

Let me now, before I go on further, reassure you that I am OK – fit as a fiddle, and away from any danger.  Since I haven’t a camera I’m having a portrait done here – by one of our lads.  You probably have received my native pieces and Top [brother] has his boomerang.  Also, I’ve sent a portrait of a native family to you.  Hope you get the lot.  Possibly I’ll be able to procure a few more novelties, grass skirts – arrows, native instruments, things that are not too large to be mailed.  If I mailed a lizard, he’d die enroute.

Last night I went to the movies and saw “Three Sons” – Boy, it was from hunger.

Received cigs from Syl’s sister and brother-in-law.  Nice people.  Stepped on a nail last P.M. about 20:00 hours and got a tetnus “shot”.  Jeeze, but it’s hot!  I change clothes twice a day and shower twice – when it can be done.  Naturally, we dress on Sunday.  Yep – I put my socks on.  Abbreviated shorts, shoes and sun helmet I wear everyday, but I like to dress up on Sunday – I put on socks.  Ho, hum.

Saw a short concerning skiing – darned near caught a cold.

From what the boys (new arrivals) have told me – the people in the States don’t even know that a war is going on.  They had better be careful.  We do need a lot of things.  I hope production will be speeded up more – we that we may be able to use some of it.

Did you ever taste “Aussie” baked beans?  No – DON’T.  I think one word to the wise is sufficient.

Come on gang – news is the thing, and not about the war, either.  I love you all and miss you all horribly.

____________________

New Guinea
Sept. 23, 1942

Well, well, it’s 4 days, or is it 5, since I last wrote you?  Have been very, very busy here of late.  I no longer count the days since we’ve left.  They seem no longer to hold any significance.  Each day being more like the preceding one.  Of course there are moments of tribulation, but they don’t remain as a memory.  All I personally think about is 6237 [Christian Street].  Naturally, things happen here, that don’t occur at home, but I can assure you, that when we do get home – you’ll hear very little from me – concerning New Guinea – I shall relate, however, the funnier side, the side that really, to us, is the morale builder.  Enough of my sentimentality.  What’s new?  How is everyone?

Big news!  We are to get a furlough!  Vacation to you people.  Not all at once – just a very few at a time.  Sort of a rest – if you want to call it that.  Where are we going?  Well, that all depends.  All, I’m sure are going to “somewhere in Australia” – I, back to see the “Greens” and “Cromwells” and a host of friends.  Regardless of the length of time we get – I’m sure that we will spend it having a grand time.

I still don’t drink – and I’m still not tatooed.  Then after that is over – back to New Guinea.  When will it begin?  There again, I can’t answer.  I don’t know.  Maybe a month, maybe two – who knows?  We talk about it incessantly.  Plan – and re-plan.  Jeezel – but it will be great.  I mean it will be something.  Enough of this.

Heard station KWID, San Francisco, the other night.  Bing Crosby, James Cagney, and a host of others.  Sorta made me feel good.  Last night, we heard a bit of propaganda from Japan – what a mess of junk.  Said we lost our whole fleet at Coral Sea, Midway, and one other action.  Can’t see how anyone can believe that stuff.

Last evening I met Lt. Max Daroff and a Major Williams, also Captain (I forgot his name).  Well, the Major had asked me (when we held “Yom Kippur” services), if I could get together a “minyon” for him.  So we held a “minyon” (in my tent) by flashlight!  Never was “Kaddish” said in such environs as this, and I’m sure never under such circumstances – possibly better, but I can assure you never worse.

Well, that’s that.  Maybe you’d like a description of it?  Maybe Rabbi Matt wouldn’t consider it absolutely right, but nevertheless, in New Guinea it was perfect (at least the Major thought so).  Dad, here it goes.  Let me know what you think, please!  Well, we had 12 men to begin with – some wore sun helmets – some helmets – other caps and overseas caps – most had shorts, another had his coveralls – of course, all the officers were dressed in sun tan uniforms.  With my (“sider”) and flashlight, held by me, over the Major’s shoulder, we began.  (“Sheer Hama alos henay”) to (“Vahed V’ahl coll Ma-Ahson) then they said (the two mourners) (“Yiskadahl Va – Yiskadash”).  So, handshaking went the rounds – they left the gang busted up.  There you have it.  Short and sweet – but if it isn’t exactly so, believe me – it was said from he heart.  I guess that’s what counts.  Incidentally, you ask, “Where did you get a “sider”?  Well, when we were in Australia – I had asked a certain Rabbi for one – he obliged.  So there you have it.  I believe I told you in a previous letter all about it.

What’s new here?  Read your daily papers.

I miss you more and more each day, and love you twice as much.

Wolfe

____________________

New Guinea
September 26, 1942

Dearest Everybody:

What do you think happened today.

First, I picked up a small bundle of newspapers and the N.Y. Times magazines.  Papers were grand.  Everybody loves them – naturally, when I’m finished I pass them around to the other boys.

Then the other package was from Isabelle Cohen – 1 carton cigs, 1 Yardley shaving cream cup – 4 boxes chicklets and 2 small cans of tuna packed in peanut oil.  My eyes virtually popped out, at such an array.  The tuna was swell – of the cigs – no mention is made – that is, after you roll them for a while – chicklets – superb.  As for the shaving cream – we won’t use it for a while – due to the fact that (as I’ve told you) I’ve a goatee and a muzzy.

I’m well – weigh 11 stone 10 lbs., which equals 164 lbs.  Don’t worry about me for I shall be, and am, quite safe.

Well – folksies – that’s all for this P.M. – so I’ll sign off.

But before I do I wish to be remembered to all our neighbors, and friends, and by all means, Clifton.  Bye now –

I love and miss you horribly.

Wolfe

____________________

August 20, 1942

Dearest Everybody:

Today I sent you a V … – letter – tomorrow a cable.  I must tell you what happened to me today.  First came the Bulletin and the Readers Digest from you –

Coming down the list, you first Dad.  J.N.F. year book pages.  Whoa – I made the book – not bad.  Thanks, Dad.  Confidentially, your picture (with the old guys) is not so hot.  You’re much to [sic] young to be associated with those old “shleppers”.  Before I forget – one of the Jewish boys in our outfit received a letter from his brother telling of the death of their mother.  I got together a “minyan” for him and I made him say “Kaddish” – probably the first time a “Minyan” was ever held in New Guinea.

Love,

Wolfe

____________________

New Guinea
Sept. 27, 1942

Dearest Family:

Check your notes on your letter to me dates Aug. 30.  As per your request I shall answer all your questions as concise and as clearly as possible.  Meanwhile, thanks for your picture taken behind the garage.

Mother:  I’m glad you received my gifts – and liked them – this is the first notice that I have had to the effect that they arrived safely.  I have answered pertaining to my work – but I shall do so again.  When I was at Jefferson Barracks I took the necessary examinations – so far as I know, I did pass them for aviation mechanics.  But as the schools were complete and they (the army) had no calls for mechanics at this time – we were told that we would have to wait.  Then, I was asked by a Lieutenant if I would be the announcer for the Pres. Ball in St. Louis.  Well, a “shipping list: had been already made and nothing could be done to get me off.  We did practice – but that is where I left them.  Then to Mitchell Field – before we could turn around to find out what was what – we all entrained for Bangor, Maine.  Immediately, we knew what was in the wind.

Well – that’s the story.  My first job was when we arrived in “Aussie”.  “M.P.” or security section – but after a few months I was relieved – believe you me, was I relieved!  So, from there I took over the “Rec Hall” (recreation hall).  Ran table tennis tourneys – had guest players give exhibitions – checker tourneys – chess and any other games the boys wanted.  When our unit came to this island –naturally, me, too – what I had anticipated was just a trifle different. 

Quite different – read your newspapers – that’s all.  Now, I’m on different details (a detail is a working unit) – we do a load of things.  Yep – I had to come all the way to New Guinea to get K.P.  Now, I ask you – hain’t that something?  I do have a little belly – actually it is exceptionally small – quite – my weight is just 11 stone 10 lbs. – which equals 164 lbs.

Side note – I’m sitting now, in front of a short wave radio – just heard “Hi Neighbor” program.  Darned good.  Back to your letter.  The radio – playing “I’m getting sentimental over you.”  Personally speaking – I’ve been and continue to be sentimental over all of you.  To Mr. Berkowitz – my best regards, I’ll eat every end of bologna he has in stock – I can just taste them – even over the “Bully Beef”.  When his pickled lox does arrive – yeh man, out of my way!  Hope it doesn’t curdle, or whatever pickled lox does.

Dad: your carton of cigs hasn’t yet arrived.  Maybe tomorrow.  Wrote you last nite.  I told you about receiving Bulletin of July 21 and 22 for which – thanks, Dad.

Damm glad you got my cables.  Can you comprehend them?  I’m positive you folks write me often – but when one is here – his head does funny things.  Such as – thinking his folks and friends don’t write.  But we know you all do, but the mail is slow.  This letter was a rare exception (yours of today).  I did not  as yet, receive your cable of July 16th.  Tell that to Western Union.

Love,
Wolfe

____________________

Reference

440th Signal Battalion, at
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/440th_Signal_Battalion_(United_States)

 

 

Soldiers from New York: Jewish Soldiers in The New York Times, in World War Two: PFC Samuel J. Brandstein

A member of the 77th Infantry Division, PFC Samuel J. Brandstein was killed at Okinawa on May 13, 1945.  His name appeared in one of the last WW II Casualty Lists to have been appeared in the Times (on April 21, 1946), while his obituary – one of several published in the Times that year – was published on March 9. 

Born in 1912, he was married to Flora L. Brandstein, and the couple lived at 2675 Morris Ave., in the Bronx. 

PFC Brandstein’s body was never found.  His name is commemorated on the Tablets of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial, in Honolulu, Hawaii.  He received the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.  Like many American Jewish servicemen, his name is not listed in the book American Jews in World War Two.

__________

Brooklyn Soldier Killed On Okinawa May 13, 1945

Pfc. Samuel J. Brandstein, of Company F, 306th Infantry, Seventy-Seventh Division, son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Brandstein of 1835 Seventy-seventh Street, Brooklyn, who was previously reported missing, was killed in action on Okinawa May 13, 1945, according to word received here.  He was 33 years old.

He had also fought on Guam, Leyte and in the Philippines.  Born in Brooklyn, he attended New Utrecht High School and Long Island University.  He left the employ of the Western Union Company to enter the service in March, 1942.  He went overseas in April, 1943.  Besides his parents, he leaves a widow, Mrs. Flora Brandstein, and a brother, Dr. Edward Brandstein.

__________

Some other Jewish military casualties on Sunday, May 13, 1945 include…

Killed in Action
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Gellar, James M., PFC, 36681494, Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart
United States Army, 99th Infantry Division, 381st Infantry Regiment, F Company
Mrs. Mary Miller (aunt), 111 Rebecca Place, Peoria, Il.
Born 5/14/25
Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii – Plot M-121; Buried 3/9/49
American Jews in World War Two – 100

Samuel
, Gerhard, PFC, 35904219

United States Army, 77th Infantry Division, 305th Infantry Regiment
Mr. and Mrs. Gustav (8/2/87-1954) and Gertrud (Bruck) Samuel (parents), 3750 Carrollton Ave., Indianapolis, In.; Arnold and Susie Samuel (brother and sister); Fred A. Samuel (cousin)
Born in Germany, at Rodalben in der Pfalz; 1/9/26
Mount Olive Cemetery, Solon, Ohio
Aufbau 7/6/45
Over The Front – Summer, 2000
American Jews in World War Two – 124

Killed (Non-Battle)

Landau, Mary M., PFC, A-207742
Mr. Louis Landau (father), Miss Renee Landau (sister), 559 Glenmore Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Born 12/13/06
Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo. – Section 70, Grave 16187-89; Buried 6/29/59
News Item 6/10/45
American Jews in World War Two – 370

Naimer
, Belle G., Sgt., A-116702

Mr. David Naimer (father), 136 East 208th St., Bronx, N.Y.; Gus, Harry, and Jack (brothers)
Born 10/31/11
Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo. – Section 70, Grave 16187-89; Buried 6/29/59
News Item 6/10/45
American Jews in World War Two – Not listed

Mary Landau and Belle Naimer were two among the twenty-three crew and passengers who were killed in the loss of a 317th Troop Carrier Group C-47 (41-23952; “Gremlin Special / Guinea Gopher“) during a sight-seeing flight over the Balim Valley of Central New Guinea.  Caught in a down-draft, the aircraft, piloted by Colonel Peter Prossen, crashed, leaving only five survivors.  Of the five, PFC Eleanor Hanna and S/Sgt Laura Besley died of their wounds the next day.  The three eventual survivors, T/Sgt. Kenneth Decker, Cpl. Margaret J. Hastings, 1 Lt. John S. McColum were rescued 47 days late through extraordinary efforts by the Army Air Force and Filipino paratroopers, who evacuated the survivors by glider.  The loss of the plane is covered by MACR 14697.

This compelling story received national news attention in June of 1945.  This was particularly so in New York State newspapers (Albany Times-Union, Binghamton Press, Brooklyn Eagle, New York Sun, and New York Post) probably because survivor Margaret Hastings was from Oswego.  Especially detailed was the story “Mystery Valley of Shangri-La Isolates Plane Crash Survivors”, filed by Associated Press reporter Dean Schedler, which was published in the Sun on June 8.  This two-page article provides a full list of crew and passengers, along with the towns and cities where their next-of-kin resided.

Both the Albany Times-Union and New York Sun specifically mentioned Belle Naimer, the Times-Union reporting (in an A.P. story):

MET SAME FATE AS HER FIANCE

NEW YORK, June 8 (AP) – WAC Sgt. Belle G. Naimer of the Bronx, one of 20 persons killed in on May 13 when an Army plane crashed in New Guinea’s hidden “Shangri-La” valley, met the same fate as her fiance, her father, David Naimer, said today.

The attractive, 32-year-old woman had been engaged to an Army Air Force Lieutenant who was killed in a plane crash in Europe while en route to the front, he said.

The father, almost totally blind, said he did not know the lieutenant’s name.

He said he last received a letter from his daughter May 9, from New Guinea.

Both the Sun and the New York Post reported that a funeral service was later conducted by aircraft the crash site by Catholic and Protestant Chaplains, with twenty-one grave markers (one of which was a Magen David) being dropped to the crash site.  In that regard, it is interesting – but not unusual – that while Mary Landau’s name would eventually be listed in American Jews in World War Two, Bell Naimer’s name did not appear in that book. 

In 1959, the remains of eighteen casualties from the crash were re-interred in a collective grave at Section 70, Site 16187-89, at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery on June 29, 1959.  The image below, by FindAGrave contributor Carol Beck, shows this group’s collective grave marker.  (Three other casualties, including Sgt. Besley and PFC Hanna, are buried in individual graves.)

The following article about Belle Naimer, provided by FindAGrave contributor Astrid, can be found at Sgt. Naimer’s FindAGrave biographical profile.  This biography notably differs from the item published in the Albany Times-Union in reporting that her fiance was killed in October or November of 1944, during a crash at or near the Mississippi River. 

Unfortunately, his name is unknown.

  ____________________

Writer Mitchell Zuckoff, author of 13 Hours in Benghazi and Frozen in Time, has fully chronicled the story of the Gremlin Special / Guinea Gopher in his book, Lost in Shangri-La, which is directly available through his website. 

References

Dublin, Louis I., and Kohs, Samuel C., American Jews in World War II – The Story of 550,000 Fighters for Freedom, The Dial Press, New York, N.Y., 1947.

C-47A 41-23952 (PacificWrecks)

Lost in Shangri-La, by Mitchell Zuckoff

PFC Mary M. Landau (FindAGrave.com)

S/Sgt. Belle G. Naimer (FindAGrave.com)

Soldiers from New York: Jewish Soldiers in The New York Times, in World War Two: PFC Montrose (“Monte”) M. Brenner

PFC Montrose M. (“Monty”) Brenner, a member of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, was killed in action at Okinawa on April 22, 1945.  The son of Nathan and Ida Brenner, he was the brother of Seymour Brenner and Pauline (Brenner) Speckler.  His obituary accompanied a Casualty List published in the Times on August 16, 1945.  He was awarded the Silver Star and Purple Heart. 

Pfc. Monte M. Brenner, 21-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Brenner of 1555 East Ninth Street, Brooklyn, was killed on Okinawa Island on April 22, according to word received here.

He served with Army Ordnance at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, and after being transferred to the Pacific Theatre was stationed on New Caledonia.  He took part in the invasion of Leyte and was a member of the Seventeenth Infantry Regiment, Seventh Division, during the landings on Okinawa.

He attended New York University before entering the Army.

____________________

PFC Brenner was buried at Mount Hebron Cemetery, in Flushing, on February 4, 1949.  His grave location is Werenczanker Bukowin Society, Block 45, Reference 4, Section H/I, Line 6, Grave 8/6.

____________________

Some other Jewish military casualties on Sunday, April 22, 1945, include…

Killed in Action
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Bernstein, Melvin, PFC, 17078056, Purple Heart
United States Army, 10th Mountain Division, 87th Mountain Infantry Regiment, G Company
Mr. Harry Z. Bernstein (father), 2515 Country Club Ave., Omaha, Ne.
Born 1922
Florence American Cemetery, Florence, Italy – Plot E, Row 5, Grave 31
American Jews in World War II – 220

Bretholtz, Sidney, Pvt., 42033699, Purple Heart
United States Army, 85th Infantry Division, 337th Infantry Regiment
Mr. Leon Bretholtz (father), PFC Jack Bretholtz (brother), 2395 Morris Ave., Bronx, N.Y.
Place of burial unknown
Casualty List 5/15/45
American Jews in World War II – 283

Brownstein, Melvin I., Pvt., 32623022, Purple Heart
United States Army, 9th Armored Division, 89th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, Mechanized
Mr. Max Brownstein (father), Mr. Bob Brownstein (cousin), 990 Aldus St., New York, N.Y.
Place of burial unknown
Casualty List 5/31/45
American Jews in World War II – 285

Ezra
, Joseph, Pvt., 32964854, Silver Star, Purple Heart

United States Army, 10th Mountain Division, 20th Armored Infantry Battalion
Mrs. Anne Ezra (wife), 77-79 Division Ave., Bronx, N.Y.
Mount Hebron Cemetery, Flushing, N.Y. – Life & Charity Society, Inc. Section, Block 109, Reference 20, Line PP-4, Grave 1 (Buried 8/17/48)
Casualty List 5/31/45
American Jews in World War II – 304

Weiner, George A., 2 Lt., 0-2007276, Silver Star, Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart
United States Army, 96th Infantry Division, 383rd Infantry Regiment
Mrs. Norma B. Weiner (wife), 3300 Lake Shore Drive, Apt. 9E, Chicago, Il.
Student at Northwestern University
Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii
Casualty List 6/4/45
American Jews in World War II – 120

Welgus, Morton, PFC, 39339990, Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart
United States Army, 27th Infantry Division, 105th Infantry Regiment
Mrs. Pauline Welgus (mother), 151 North Ainsworth St., Portland, Or.
Born 8/7/25
Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii – Plot O-346; Buried 3/9/49
American Jews in World War II – 507

Wounded in Action

Levenson, Harold, Pvt., Purple Heart; Wounded on Okinawa
United States Army
Mrs. Fannie Levenson (mother), Pvt. Roy L. Levenson (brother), 275 Merton Road, Detroit, Mi.
Born Indianapolis, In., 1924
Student at University of Michigan
The Jewish News (Detroit) 6/8/45
American Jews in World War II – 193

Reference

Dublin, Louis I., and Kohs, Samuel C., American Jews in World War II – The Story of 550,000 Fighters for Freedom, The Dial Press, New York, N.Y., 1947

Soldiers from New York: Jewish Soldiers in The New York Times, in World War Two: Captain Arthur H. Bijur

Captain Arthur H. Bijur, a member of the 43rd Signal Company, 43rd Infantry Division, was killed in action on January 14, 1945, near Rosario, on the island of Luzon, in the Philippines.  Awarded the Silver Star and Purple Heart, his obituary was published in the Times on February 11, 1945, while his Silver Star citation was published on August 22. 

His parents were Nathan I. and Eugenie Bijur; his brothers Herbert and Lt. William Bijur; his sister Mrs. Jean Weiss.  The National World War Two Memorial Registry includes entries in his honor by Dr. John Wolf (his friend), and classmate John Liebmann.

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Word Received of Death in Action in Philippines

Capt. Arthur Henry Bijur, who served in the Army Signal Corps, was killed in action on Luzon in the Philippines on Jan. 14, according to word from the War Department received Friday by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan I. Bijur of Long Branch, N.J.  He would have been 26 years old on Feb. 14.

Born in New York City, Captain Bijur was an outstanding athlete at the Horace Mann School, winning four major letters.  He later attended Brown University, where he was captain of the soccer team.  He was graduated from the university in 1941 and enlisted in the Army shortly afterwards.

In March, 1942, he was appointed a second lieutenant and in August was shipped to the Pacific, where he took part in the Munda campaign, and the invasion of New Guinea and the Philippines.  Captain Bijur was the recipient of two citations.

In addition to his parents, he is survived by two brothers, Herbert Bijur and Lieut. William Bijur; and a sister, Mrs. Joseph D. Weiss.

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POSTHUMOUS AWARD

Silver Star for Captain Bijur of Army Signal Corps

The Silver Star Medal has been awarded posthumously to Capt. Arthur H. Bijur, 242 Bath Avenue, Long Branch, N.J., of the Army Signal Corps for gallantry in action against the Japanese on Luzon.  He lost his life when he crawled out of his foxhole to warn his men that enemy fire would soon run through their area.  He was killed by an enemy shell shortly after his last warning was given.

Captain Bijur’s citation praises his “keen devotion to duty, loyal consideration for his men and great courage.”  He was overseas for thirty-four months with the Forty-Third Division and was in action at Guadalcanal, in the Northern Solomons, in New Guinea and on Luzon.

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Born in 1920, Captain Bijur is buried at the Manila American Cemetery, in the Philippines (Plot A, Row 9, Grave 104). 

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Some other Jewish military casualties on Sunday, January 14, 1945, include the following…

Killed in Action
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Benenson, Irving, T/5, 32195917, Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart
United States Army, 3rd Armored Division, 32nd Armored Regiment; Casualty at Vielsalm, Belgium
Mrs. Lillian Benenson (wife), 1659 President St., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Born 1917
Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville, Ky. – E, 268 (Collective grave with T/5 Dee E. Hobbs)
Casualty List 3/14/45
American Jews in World War II – 273

Bornkind
, Jack, PFC, 16150444 (No Purple Heart?)

United States Army, 70th Infantry Division, 274th Infantry Regiment, B Company
Captured 1/14/45; Died while Prisoner of War 4/23/45
Stalag 9B (Bad Orb); Berga am Elster (German POW # 27554)
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan N. and Rachel (Huldensman) Bornkind (parents); Bessie, Hildah, Josephine, Celia, Llecca, Sarah, and Louis (sisters and brother), 731 East Dartmouth Road, Flint, Mi.
Born 1/31/24, Michigan
Beth Olem Cemetery, Hamtramack, Mi. – Buried 1/9/49
American Jews in World War II – 188

Chernoff
, Alvin S., PFC, 32408380, Purple Heart

United States Army, 11th Armored Division, 55th Armored Infantry Battalion; Casualty in Belgium (Died of wounds)
Mr. Louis H. (“Herbert Lorin”) Chernoff (father), 115 W. 86th St., New York, N.Y.
Born 1914
Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg – Plot G, Row 11, Grave 19
Casualty List 3/12/45
American Jews in World War II – Not listed

Cooper
, Paul, T/5, 32425490, Purple Heart

United States Army, 35th Infantry Division, 134th Infantry Regiment
Mr. and Mrs. Harry and Rose Kupersmith (parents), 2764 Creston Ave., Bronx, N.Y.
Born 1909
Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg – Plot E, Row 7, Grave 20 (ABMC gives date as 1/10/45)
Casualty List 3/24/45
American Jews in World War II – 293

Coslite
, Milton G., S/Sgt., 31051962, Purple Heart

United States Army, 11th Armored Division, 55th Armored Infantry Battalion; Casualty in Belgium
Mrs. Eva Ginsberg (mother), 2168 63rd St., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Born 1920
Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg – Plot C, Row 2, Grave 18
Casualty List 3/13/45
American Jews in World War II – 294

Elpern
, Ivan L., 1 Lt., 0-385676, Purple Heart

United States Army, 6th Armored Division, 50th Armored Infantry Battalion; Casualty in Belgium
Mr. and Mrs. Lou H. and Margaret G. Elpern (parents), 101 Central Square, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Marvin Fortman (cousin)
Born 3/8/17; Enlisted 1935
(Matzeva and 293 File give military organization as “6th Armored Division, 50th Armored Infantry Battalion”, Member of 28th Infantry Division, 110th Infantry Regiment, from 2/17/41 to 7/19/42″)
Temple Emanuel Cemetery, Greensburg, Pa.
Jewish Criterion (Pittsburgh) 9/7/45
American Jews in World War II – 518

Ivan’s portrait – below – was published in Pittsburgh’s Jewish Criterion on September 7, 1945, in an extremely detailed – and quite accurate – article commemorating Jewish servicemen from the Pittsburgh metropolitan area who were killed or died during the just-ended war.  The article (perhaps the subject of a future blog post…?) carries brief biographical profiles, and photographs, of 83 servicemen, and lists the names of 32 other servicemen for whom information and photographs – at the time of publication – were missing.  In terms of individual attention, communal memory, and foresight, the Criterion’s effort was as admirable as it was remarkable, for not all Jewish periodicals published such retrospectives.

Haberer, Martin, Pvt., 32962210, Purple Heart
United States Army, 101st Airborne Division, 327th Glider Infantry Regiment
Mr. and Mrs. Max and Laura (Wertheimer) Haberer (parents), 3810 Broadway, Apt. 4-A, New York, N.Y.
Born Germany, 1925
Long Island National Cemetery, Farmingdale, N.Y. – Section J, Grave 15963
Casualty List 3/13/45
Aufbau 2/16/45
American Jews in World War II – 339

Levine, Alfred, Pvt., 39015817, Purple Heart
United States Army, 26th Infantry Division, 101st Infantry Regiment
Mrs. Ida S. Levine (mother), 1427 Levonia Ave., Los Angeles, Ca.
Luxembourg American Cemetery, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg – Plot H, Row 5, Grave 12
Casualty List 3/1/45
American Jews in World War II – 48

Rindsberg
, Walter J., Pvt., 42071539, Purple Heart

United States Army, 84th Infantry Division, 335th Infantry Regiment
Mr. and Mrs. Harry and Irma (Himmelreich) Rindsberg (parents), 44 Bennett Ave., New York, N.Y.
Born 1926, in Germany
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium – Plot D, Row 7, Grave 8
Casualty List 3/8/45
Aufbau 2/2/45, 2/16/45
American Jews in World War II – 413

Yusin, Irving, Pvt., 13153939, Purple Heart
United States Army, 11th Armored Division, 21st Armored Infantry Battalion
Mrs. Celia Yusin (mother), 2853 Barker Ave., New York, N.Y.
Born 4/1/22
Wellwood Cemetery, East Farmingdale, N.Y.
Casualty List 3/14/45
American Jews in World War II – 476

Zion, Morris J., PFC, 35289875, Purple Heart
United States Army, 83rd Infantry Division, 330th Infantry Regiment; Died of wounds
Mr. and Mrs. Max and Rose Zion (parents), 3738 E. 139th St., Cleveland, Oh.
ART 1C Joseph Zion, Harry Zion, and Robert Zion (brothers); Tillie Zion, Mrs. Mildred Hershman, and Mrs. Sara Oriti (sisters)
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium – Plot D, Row 13, Grave 12
Cleveland Press & Plain Dealer, 2/2/45
American Jews in World War II – 504

A Portrait of Morris, provided Patti Johnson (a Volunteer Researcher studying the WW II Army Air Force’s Mediterranean-based 57th Bomb Wing) can be found at his biographical profile at the FindAGrave.com website.  This image is presented below: 

Killed (Non-Battle)
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Morris’ brother Joseph, a Navy Aviation Radio Technician, lost his life only one week before: On January 7, 1945.  His picture – displayed below – was also provided by Patti Johnson, and like that of Joseph, can be found at his FineAGrave.com biographical profile.  His name also appears on page 504 of American Jews in World War II. 

Born on August 15, 1908, Joseph was a passenger on a Martin JM-1 Marauder (Bureau Number 66724) of Naval Squadron VJ-16.  Piloted by Lt. Raymond Mara, the aircraft disappeared near Trinidad, in the Central Atlantic Ocean.  There were no survivors from the six men aboard the aircraft.

Morris and Joseph were members of the approximately fifty American Jewish families who lost two sons during the Second World War.  (The Liebfeld family of Milwaukee lost all three sons: Morris (USMC) and Sam (USAAF) in mid-1944, and Sigmund (also Army Air Force) on a domestic non-combat flight in October of 1945.  The brothers are buried at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, in Saint Paul.) 

These sets of brothers were profiled by Helen Kantzler in the appropriately entitled article “Double Gold Stars”, which was published in the Jewish Criterion (Pittsburgh) on September 20, 1946. 

Joseph’s name is commemorated on the Tablets of the Missing, at the East Coast Memorial in New York City.

Prisoner of War

Lippin, Robert, PFC, 32974463
United States Army, 26th Infantry Division, 328th Infantry Regiment
Stalag 12A (Limburg an der Lahn) (German POW # 96673)
Mr. Bernard Lippin (father), 8020 Bay Parkway, Brooklyn, 14, N.Y.
Born 6/7/23
NARA RG 242, 190/16/01/01, Entry 279, Box 41
American Jews in World War II – Not listed

Wounded in Action

Alper, Eugene, Pvt., 37642240, Purple Heart; Wounded in Germany
United States Army
Mr. Nathan Alper (father), 738 Interdrive, University City, St. Louis, Mo.
Born Missouri, 1925
Saint Louis Post Dispatch 2/21/45
American Jews in World War II – 207

Hershfield
, Jesse L., PFC, 33810667, Purple Heart; Wounded in France

United States Army
Mrs. Lillian Hershfield (wife) Rachelle (daughter), 3320 W. Cumberland St., Philadelphia, Pa.
Born 1921
National Jewish Welfare Board record card incorrectly gives surname as “Hershfeld”
The Jewish Exponent 2/23/45, 3/9/45
Philadelphia Inquirer 2/13/45
Philadelphia Record 2/13/45
American Jews in World War II – 528

Other Incident

Schrag, Emil, PFC, 31336965, Medical Corps, Bronze Star Medal
United States Army, 30th Infantry Division, 120th Infantry Regiment
Unknown incident in Germany 1/14/45 – RMC 4/12/45
Mrs. Hilde Dorothee (Schrag) Heimann (sister), New York, N.Y.
Mrs. Lena Schrag (mother), 510 W. 184th St., Bridgeport, Ct.
Born Germany, 1925
Aufbau 2/9/45, 5/4/45
American Jews in World War II – Not Listed

Reference

Dublin, Louis I., and Kohs, Samuel C., American Jews in World War II – The Story of 550,000 Fighters for Freedom, The Dial Press, New York, N.Y., 1947

Soldiers from New York: Jewish Soldiers in The New York Times, in World War Two: Private Alfred A. Berg

An obituary for Private Alfred A. Berg, an Army infantryman, accompanied a Casualty List published in The Times on February 22, 1945.

Born on August 31, 1923, he was a member of the 89th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized), of the 9th Armored Division, Private Berg was killed in action on December 23, 1944.  He was buried at Riverside Cemetery, in Rochelle Park, New Jersey, on July 27, 1948.  (Family Section 11, Map 325, Block I, Section 33, Plot 27, Grave 1.)

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Veteran of D-Day Landings is Killed in Luxembourg

One of the first to hit the Normandy beaches on D-day, Pvt. Alfred A. Berg, who did reconnaissance work in the mechanized cavalry, was killed in December in the unsuccessful German counterattack in Luxembourg, the War Department has notified his family here.

Private Berg, who was 21 years old, saw active service in all the major engagements leading up to the German break-through.  He never had much time to write his family of all his experiences because, as he explained in one of his letters, “I’m always in the foxholes.”

Born in this city, he was graduated from De Witt Clinton High School in 1941.  He was active in sports and was a member of the school’s swimming team.  He attended Pennsylvania State College before enlisting in the Army on June 25, 1943.  After five and a half month’s training at Fort Reilly, Kan., he was sent to England.

The Purple Heart was awarded to him posthumously.

Surviving are his father and stepmother, Mr. and Mrs. William Berg of 639 West End Avenue; a brother, Lieut. Russell Berg, now serving with the First Army in Belgium, and a stepbrother, Pfc. Laurence Curtis, who is stationed in Spokane, Wash. 

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An image of the location of his parents’ residence, at 639 West End Avenue (from apartments.com) is shown below:

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Some other Jewish military casualties on Saturday, December 23, 1944 include the following…

Killed in Action
– .ת.נ.צ.ב.ה. –

Chodash, Joseph, Pvt., 42088672
United States Army, 87th Infantry Division, 345th Infantry Regiment, A Company, Purple Heart
Mr. Harry Chodash (father), 177 Broadway, Bayonne, N.J.; Joseph H. Chodash (nephew)
Born 12/21/15
United Hebrew Cemetery, Staten Island, N.Y.
American Jews in World War II – 229

Goldberger, Edward L., Cpl., 32797851
United States Army, 1st Infantry Division, 26th Infantry Regiment, Silver Star, Purple Heart (Matzeva gives date of 12/22/44)
Mr. Albert Goldberger (father), 1511 Sheridan Ave., New York, N.Y.; Edward and Stella (uncle and aunt)
Born 12/5/24
Riverside Cemetery, Rochelle Park, N.J. – Section Temple Beth Elohim, Map 129, Block G, Section 20, Plot 19, Grave 8; Buried 11/10/47
American Jews in World War II – 325

Hene
, Julius A., Capt., 0-477319, Purple Heart

United States Army, 106th Infantry Division, 422nd Infantry Regiment
Mrs. Bianka J. Hene (wife), 15 West 106th St., New York, N.Y.
Born 1909; Graduate of Cornell University
POW ~ 12/16/44; Interned at Stalag 12A (Limburg an der Lahn); Killed when stray bombs struck prisoners’ barracks during RAF bombing of adjacent rail yard
Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Holland – Plot F, Row 17, Grave 25
Casualty List 3/13/45; American Jews in World War II – 343

Klores
, Daniel N., PFC, 12022507, Purple Heart

United States Army, 101st Airborne Division, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment,
Mrs. Molly Klores (mother), 3109 Brighton 7th St., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Born 3/29/18
Mount Judah Cemetery, Cypress Hills, N.Y. – Section 1, Block S, Grave 138, Path R07, Charles Weinstein Society – Buried 11/29/48
Casualty List 3/9/45
American Jews in World War II – 364

Posner
, Norman F., Pvt., 42057685, Purple Heart

United States Army, 3rd Armored Division, 36th Armored Infantry Regiment
Mr. Jacob Posner (father), Box 721 / 940 North Hill St., Oceanside, Ca. // 5151 North 4th St., St. Petersburg, Fl.
Born Brooklyn, N.Y., 1925
Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Holland – Plot I, Row 11, Grave 6
American Jews in World War II – not listed

Prosnick
, Leonard, 2 Lt., 0-1032549, Purple Heart

United States Army, 106th Infantry Division, 106th Reconnaissance Troops
Mrs. Gladys Alene (Scott) Prosnick (wife) and Sherrylynn Prosnick (daughter) Born 9/24/44 (Murfreesboro, Tennessee?)
Mrs. Selma Fogel (mother), 117 South 55th St., Philadelphia, Pa.
Netherlands American Cemetery, Margraten, Holland – Plot H, Row 8, Grave 5
Born Philadelphia, Pa., 6/6/21
American Jews in World War II – 544

Saltzman
, Solomon, Pvt., 42004657, Purple Heart

United States Army, 10th Armored Division, 420th Armored Field Artillery Battalion
Mrs. Ida Saltzman (mother), 700 Avenue A, Bayonne, N.J.
Born 1926
Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium – Plot H, Row 1, Grave 69
Casualty List 3/6/45
American Jews in World War II – 252

Died in other circumstance…

Feinberg, Sydney Charles, Capt., 0-482585
United States Army
Mrs. Nettie Feinberg (wife), Jimmy (son), New York, N.Y.; Mrs. Sadie Feinberg (mother); Dorothy and Melvin (brother and sister)
Graduate of Columbia University
Died in New York State
Place of burial unknown
American Jews in World War II – 305

Prisoners of War

Goldberg, Sheldon A., Pvt., 20218182, Purple Heart
United States Army, 3rd Infantry Division, 15th Infantry Regiment
POW at Reslaz Magdeburgh
Mrs. Gloria L. Goldberg (wife), 678 Linwood St., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Casualty List 6/5/45
American Jews in World War II – 325

Levy, Milton, PFC, 32874904
United States Army, 28th Infantry Division, 109th Infantry Regiment
POW at Stalag 3A (Luckenwalde)
Mrs. Lena Levy (mother), 1945 64th St., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Casualty Lists 4/19/45 and 5/23/45
American Jews in World War II – Not listed

Semel, Jason W., Sgt., 32352898
United States Army, 101st Airborne Division, 401st Glider Infantry Regiment
Location of POW Camp unknown
Mr. and Mrs. Milton and Anna Semel (parents), 305 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, N.Y.
Born N.Y., 4/21/20
Casualty List 6/21/45
American Jews in World War II – Not listed

Skoler, David, 1 Lt., 0-1292948
United States Army, 84th Infantry Division, 333rd Infantry Regiment
POW at Oflag 13B (Hammelburg)
Mrs. Gertrude Skoler (mother), 115 Quincy St., Quincy, Ma.
Casualty List 6/12/45
American Jews in World War II – Not listed

Weitman, Morris, PFC, 12219182, Purple Heart
United States Army, 82nd Airborne Division, 325th Glider Infantry Regiment
POW at Stalag 12A (Limburg an der Lahn)
Mr. Jacob Weitman (father), 212 East Seventh St., New York, N.Y.
Casualty List 6/20/45
American Jews in World War II – 471

Zimberg, Bernard, Pvt., 32204882
United States Army, 101st Airborne Division, 401st Glider Infantry Regiment
POW at Stalag 4B Muhlberg
Mrs. Bessie Zimberg (mother), 1448 57th St. / 5701 15th Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y.
Born 1914
Casualty List 7/19/45
American Jews in World War II – Not listed

Wounded in Action

Fogel, Edward, PFC, 13008356, Purple Heart (in Germany)
United States Army
Mr. George Fogel (father), 1289 East Chelten Ave., Philadelphia, Pa.
Born Pa., 1922
Philadelphia Record 1/11/45
American Jews in World War II – 521

Savran
, Bernard, PFC, 13054181, Purple Heart (in Germany)

Mrs. Fannie Savran (mother), 3122 West Clifford St., Philadelphia, Pa.
Born Pa., 1919
Philadelphia Record 2/18/45
American Jews in World War II – 549

Simon
, Henry I., PFC, 33588283, Purple Heart (in France)

United States Army
House Sergeant George Simon (father) [policeman], 5030 F St., Philadelphia, Pa.
Born Pa.; 1923
The Jewish Exponent 4/20/45
Philadelphia Record 1/30/45
American Jews in World War II – 522

Weisman
, Edward, Pvt., 33806816, Purple Heart (in France)

United States Army
Mrs. Edith Weisman (wife), 1608 S. 7th St., Philadelphia, Pa.
Born Pa.; 1914
The Jewish Exponent 2/9/45, 2/23/45
Philadelphia Record 1/28/45
American Jews in World War II – 559

Reference

Dublin, Louis I., and Kohs, Samuel C., American Jews in World War II – The Story of 550,000 Fighters for Freedom, The Dial Press, New York, N.Y., 1947.